Navigation
Abstract

One of the four horsemen of the evolutionary synthesis of the 1940s, Theodosius Dobzhansky played a crucial role in bridging the gap between theoretical and empirical approaches in genetics and in promoting the Neo-Darwinian synthesis. His contributions to the biological species concept and to an understanding the evolutionary dynamics of wild populations of Drosophila were fundamental to the development of modern population genetics and evolutionary thought.

The Dobzhansky Papers are a remnant of the correspondence and writings of the geneticist and evolutionary biologist, Theodosius Dobzhansky. The correspondence (7.5 linear feet) provides insight into Dobzhansky's scientific, philosophical, and social views, particularly during the last decade of his life. Equally valuable are the 54 notebooks (ca.1917-1975) which comprise an almost uninterrupted self-commentary on Dobzhansky's career, replete with typescripts of personal letters and short essays sent to colleagues and friends. The collection also contains two unbound volumes of annotated "reminiscences" from the Columbia Oral History Project, 1962; two bound volumes of papers dedicated to him on his 70th birthday; and 1.5 linear feet of photographs.

Background note

One of the four horsemen of the evolutionary synthesis of the 1940s, Theodosius Dobzhansky played a crucial role in bridging the gap between theoretical and empirical approaches in genetics. His contributions to the biological species concept and to an understanding the evolutionary dynamics of wild populations of Drosophila were fundamental to the development of modern population genetics and evolutionary thought.

Born in Nemirov, Ukraine, on January 29, 1900, Dobzhansky came of age during the Bolshevik Revolution, but preferring the revolution in biology to the one in politics. After receiving a degree from the University of Kiev in 1921, he stayed on as an instructor in zoology, working initially on the anatomy and systematics of the coccinellid (ladybird) beetles. On a trip to Moscow in 1923 or 1924, however, he obtained stocks of Drosophila melanogaster that had been imported to the USSR by H. J. Muller and altered the taxonomic course of his research. His demonstration of pleiotropic effects in Drosophila soon brought him to the attention of Yuri A. Filipchenko, so that in 1924 -- the year in which he married the evolutionary biologist Natalia (Natasha) Sivertsev -- he was rewarded with a lectureship at the University of Leningrad.

Although his position in the troubled world of Soviet genetics was rising, Dobzhansky sought out an International Education Board fellowship in 1927 to work in the creative hothouse of T. H. Morgan's fly lab at Columbia, following Morgan to Cal Tech two years later. The years at Cal Tech were particularly exciting ones in the history of genetics, as the largely cytogenetic work of Morgan, Calvin B. Bridges, Alfred H. Sturtevant, and H. J. Muller had begun to unravel the mechanisms of inheritance through the use of cytological and developmental techniques. When Dobzhansky joined the group in 1927, its members were busy constructing linkage maps, locating specific genes on chromosomes by statistically analyzing the frequency with which certain traits are inherited together. Furthermore, only a few months before Dobzhansky's arrival, Muller (by this time at the University of Texas) had announced his discovery that x-ray exposure dramatically increased the natural rate of mutation in Drosophila. Not surprisingly, then, Dobzhansky began irradiating flies during the summer of 1928, and he spent the following winter studying the resultant chromosomal aberrations, mapping them by the use of gene markers. His long years dissecting beetles stood him well in the enterprise, for after removing, sectioning, and staining the ovaries of a young female fly, he provided the first cytological proof of the linear arrangement of genes on chromosomes: under the microscope, Dobzhansky saw a piece of the long, rod-like third chromosome attached to the tiny dot-like fourth chromosome. In the Reminiscences, he wrote: "I don't remember whether I emitted a loud yell. No question that I felt that way." Dobzhansky was promoted to full professor in 1936.

The cytological and developmental approach at Cal Tech continued to serve Dobzhansky well into the early 1930s as he worked on the analysis of translocations and the nature of sex determination, however his differences with the Morgan group soon became evident. All along, he had maintained an active field program, roaming into the California deserts, the Yosemite and Sequoia National Parks, and as far away as Alaska and Mexico in search of wild flies. More importantly, however, he began increasingly to conceptualize the major problems in genetics within an evolutionary and populational context. For over a decade, R. A. Fisher, J.B.S. Haldane, and Sewall Wright had been reaching toward a quantitative methodology for uniting Mendelian and Darwinian theory by shifting the locus of study from the individual to the population. Recognizing that morphological change was the product of shifting gene frequencies, Fisher, Haldane and Wright developed sophisticated mathematical models to assess the relative effects of selectional pressure, mutation, and genetic drift on evolutionary change. What they lacked, above all, was empirical weight.

With this in mind, Dobzhansky and Sturtevant recognized that they could use chromosomal inversions in wild populations of D. pseudoobscura to construct phylogenies and to study evolutionary dynamics at a highly refined scale. Simultaneously, in 1935 Dobzhansky began the fundamental task of reformulating the taxonomic and morphological term "species" to bring it into line with evolutionary theory. Aware from his studies of variability in natural populations that morphological similarity could mask considerable genetic variability, he argued that regardless of the degree of morphological differentiation between populations, reproductive isolation was the surest and most biologically meaningful criterion for distinguishing species. The Jessup Lectures he delivered at Columbia University during the fall of 1936 provided him with a unique opportunity to synthesize the enormous amount of observational, experimental, and theoretical genetics he had acquired, interpreted in light of the emerging quantitative population genetics. These lectures were published in 1937 as Genetics and the Origin of Species, quickly becoming a classic in the emerging fields of evolution and population genetics and in the canon of the Neo-Darwinian Synthesis.

In 1940 Dobzhansky accepted a professorship at Columbia University, and moved back to New York. There he became a close friend of the mouse geneticist, L.C. Dunn, collaborating with him on several books, and he developed close working relationships with George Gaylord Simpson and Ernst Mayr, among others. His growing collaboration with Sewall Wright was particularly productive, with Dobzhansky providing the critical empirical tests for Wright's mathematical insights. Together, they devised methods for measuring the forces of natural selection in the laboratory and, further, for studying the interaction of evolutionary forces in natural populations. With the help of his student Bruce Wallace and Wright, Dobzhansky worked out an elaborate theory of population structure based on inherent genetic diversity. It has been said that Dobzhansky's most significant contribution was the demonstration of vast genetic diversity within each species, a diversity that coexists with the uniformity of the molecular model of the gene and the universality of the genetic code.

Dobzhansky traveled widely during his twenty-two years at Columbia: hunting flies in Guatemala, Brazil, Chile, Australia, New Guinea, Egypt, India, Indonesia, and the western United States. He published prolifically on hybrid sterility, developmental rates, enzyme polymorphisms, genetic responses to environmental change, and behavioral phenomena, such as dispersion rates (how far flies actually fly). Among his more frequent collaborators were J. T. Patterson, C. Epling, C. D. Darlington, and his two research assistants, Olga Pavlovsky and Boris Spassky. He left a substantial legacy, as well, through his students, who included Bruce Wallace, R. C. Lewontin, and E. D. Spiess, as well as several colleagues and students from South America, including A. B. da Cuhna, A. R. Cordeiro, C. Malogolowkin-Cohen, and C. Pavan.

Yet as much as Dobzhansky enjoyed the intellectual climate at Columbia, from the late 1940s on he felt underappreciated and afflicted by the grind of university politics. As a result, he abandoned Columbia in 1962 to accept a position at the Rockefeller Institute (soon to become the Rockefeller University), remaining there until his retirement in 1971. At Rockefeller he expanded the scope of his work into behavioral genetics, while continuing his analysis of enzyme polymorphisms in Drosophila willistoni. In 1966, he adopted the still novel technique of gel electrophoresis to assay individual genotypes within a population, contributing to a raging debate with Muller, James Crow, and Motoo Kimura over the amount and significance of genetic variation in natural populations.

Retiring from Rockefeller in 1971, Dobzhansky continued to remain active in the field as an adjunct professor in the department of his former student Francisco J. Ayala at the University of California, Davis. At the time of his death from lymphatic leukemia in 1975, he was actively co-editing the series Evolutionary Biology, collaborating on a textbook dealing with evolutionary topics with Ayala, G. Ledyard Stebbins, and James Valentine, and was engaged in a series of experiments on chromosomal differences between populations of Mexican Drosophila with A. L. de Garay, R. Félix Estrada, L. Levine, J. Powell, and V.M. Salceda.

Summarizing Dobzhansky's career on the basis of his scientific productivity does not quite capture its scope. From his days at Cal Tech onward, Dobzhansky regularly engaged with the philosophical and social implications of his work. His view of scientific progress was essentially Popperian -- "A scientific 'model,'" he wrote to Arthur R. Jensen in 1972, "is tested in attempts to falsify it, and the more steps it stands successfully, the more convincing it is, until finally it is taken as 'truth.'" He also situated himself within the "process" school of philosophy, although he was critical of mainstream Whiteheadian philosophers for having established "a special religion... a non-Christian religion. A sort of Unitarianism on the Whiteheadian basis" (June 15, 1974). For his own part, Dobzhansky was acutely sensitive to criticism of his philosophical (or scientific) work by other scientists, especially with respect to the reception of his popular works Mankind Evolving and The Biology of Ultimate Concern.

Deeply imbued with his faith in the Eastern Orthodox church, and steeped in an evolutionary world view, Dobzhansky held to a transcendent, cosmic evolutionism deeply influenced by the writings of the Jesuit priest, Teilhard de Chardin. His interests drew regularly him into public debates on the intersection of religion and science, criticizing Pope Paul for his antievolutionary views in the 1960s, and assailing the growing tide of Protestant creationsim of the 1960s and 1970s. In 1972, he wrote J. Kunamoto, that for him "The evolution of life, and the evolutionary origin of mankind, are scientifically established as firmly and completely as any historical event not witnessed by human observers. Any concession to anti-evolutionists, suggesting that there are scientific reasons to doubt the facticity of evolution, would be propagating a plain untruth."

The great problems of the century -- totalitarianism and racism -- also weighed heavily on Dobzhansky's conscience. With L.C. Dunn, a political fellow traveler, and later with Ashley Montagu, Dobzhansky produced a number of works on the biology of race, highlighted by the book Heredity, Race, and Society (1946). Dobzhansky argued that modern genetic studies had demonstrated that eugenical claims about the biological basis of personality and behavior were at best grossly simplified, and were more likely simply wrong. A strong critic of eugenics in the interwar period, he continued to combat "scientific" efforts to establish the facticity of racial differences, participating in the debates over IQ during the 1960s and 1970s. He was particularly adamant that a scientist working on projects concerning the genetics of behavior must remain honest and committed to the logic of his discipline, and he often wrote to scientists to remind them of this fact. At the same time, his own experiences in Russia made Dobzhansky keenly aware of the problems of intellectual freedom and the necessity of supporting even unpopular modes of speech. He bore an unwavering hatred for the Soviet system and took an active role in writing about the Lysenko controversy.

Scope and content

The Dobzhansky Papers are a remnant of the correspondence and writings of the geneticist and evolutionary biologist, Theodosius Dobzhansky. Offering far richer documentation for the last decade of his career than the first three, the correspondence (7.5 linear feet) provides insight into Dobzhansky's scientific, philosophical, and social views. Equally valuable are the 54 notebooks (ca.1917-1975) which comprise an almost uninterrupted personal commentary on Dobzhansky's entire career, replete with typescripts of personal letters and short essays sent to colleagues and friends. The collection also contains two unbound volumes of annotated transcripts from the Columbia Oral History Project, 1962; two bound volumes of papers dedicated to him on his 70th birthday; and 1.5 linear feet of photographs.

"There is in this office a letter-filing cabinet," Theodosius Dobzhansky wrote to a friend in 1968, "where letters are kept for some time, usually two or three years, and then most are either discarded or placed on a back shelf" (Dansereau, 1968). The periodic destruction of files which Dobzhansky described was further accentuated by five major moves during his career, once from Russia to the United States and three times across the North American continent. At each remove, he further weeded out materials that he considered superfluous, uninteresting or unimportant. Thus the majority of the surviving papers either date from after his move to Davis in 1971, or reflect those memories he consciously wished to preserve. The majority of letters concern his ongoing genetic projects from 1971 to 1975; philosophical, ethical and religious issues (including problems raised by behavioral genetics and the IQ debate); and political issues, but routine office correspondence is also abundant. Above all, the Papers display the mix of scientific pugnacity and warm personal relationships with friends and former students that characterized Dobzhansky's writing.

The forty-four page summary of Dobzhansky's career prepared by R. C. Lewontin, M. M. Green, F. J. Ayala, and I. M. Lerner for G. W. Beadle's nomination of Dobzhansky to the Nobel Committee in 1975 gives a comprehensive analysis of Dobzhansky's scientific accomplishments, and contains his complete bibliography, 1918-1975.

Series ICorrespondence, 1927-197515 boxes (7.5 linear feet)
Series IICorrespondence with Ernst Mayr, 1937-19751 box (0.25 linear feet)
Series IIIResearch notebooks, ca.1917-19753 boxes (1.5 linear feet)
Series IVHuman Culture (manuscript)1 box (0.25 linear feet)
Series VPapers dedicated to Dobzhansky, 19702 vols. (0.25 linear feet)
Series VIReminiscences, 19622 vols. (0.25 linear feet)
Series VIIJournal, 19261 vol. (0.1 linear feet)
Series VIIIAwards and memorabilia, 1935-19753 boxes (1.25 linear feet)
Series IXPhotographs, ca.1929-19743 boxes (1.5 linear feet)

Collection information

Provenance

The Dobzhansky Papers have come to the APS in several distinct donations. The bulk arrived as a bequest of Theodosius Dobzhansky in 1976, with later accruals from Ernst Mayr (Series II) and Francisco J. Ayala.

Photocopies of Dobzhansky's correspondence sent to Vavilov (1931), Filipchenko (1925-1930), and Medvedev (1963-1975) were obtained from the M. E. Saltykov-Shchedrin State Public Library, Leningrad (St. Petersburg), Russia.

Preferred citation

Cite as: Theodosius Dobzhansky Papers, American Philosophical Society.

Alternate formats available

The originals of Dobzhansky's correspondence with Filipchenko, Vavilov, and Medvedev housed at the M. E. Saltykov-Shchedrin State Public Library, Leningrad (St. Petersburg), Russia, has been microfilmed on Film 1484.

Other finding aids

The printed version of Bentley Glass' A Guide to the Genetics Collections of the American Philosophical Society contains another biography of Dobzhansky and a further description of the Dobzhansky Papers.

General physical description

12.25 linear feet

Related material

Correspondence of Thoedosius Dobzhansky with Yuri A. Filipichenko, Nikolai Medvedev, and N.I. Vavilov, in Russian (Mss.B.D65.u).

Dobzhansky appears as a correspondent in many APS collections, some in substantial quantity. Among the more important sources for Dobzhansky are the papers of Hampton Carson (22 items), Ernst Caspari (36 items), Milislav Demerec (171 items), L. C. Dunn (353 letters), I. Michael Lerner (280 items), Ashley Montagu (125 items), George Gaylord Simpson (88 items), Alexander Sokoloff (100 items), Curt Stern (101 items), and Bruce Wallace (114 items).

Bibliography

Mark B. Adams, ed., The Evolution of Theodosius Dobzhansky: Essays on His Life and Thought in Russia and America (Princeton, N.J.: Princeton, 1994).

Francisco Ayala, Obituary of Theodosius Dobzhansky, National Academy of Sciences Biographical Memoirs 55 (1985), 163-215.

Bentley Glass, The Roving Naturalist: Travel Letters of Theodosius Dobzhansky, APS Memoir 139 (1980).

African American History Note

Scholars of African American history will find interesting material in this collection on the subjects of race and biology, in particular in regards to Dobzhansky's work with L. C. Dunn and Ashley Montagu.

Genetics Note

This collection contains materials which relate to the history of genetics.

AuthorFormatDate
Alpatov, Vladimir VladimirovichCorrespondence (24 items)1930
Anderson, Wyatt W.Correspondence (15 items)1971-1975
Astaurov, Boris L.Correspondence (9 items)1969-1974
Ayala, Francisco J.Correspondence (13 items)1970-1975
Birch, L. CharlesCorrespondence (38 items)1961-1975
Boesiger, ErnestCorrespondence (50 items)1973-1975
Burhoe, Ralph W.Correspondence (29 items)1970-1974
Carson, Hampton L.Correspondence (44 items)1970-1975
Cordeiro, Antonio R.Correspondence (7 items)1967-1973
Crow, James F.Correspondence (15 items)1961-1972
Crumpacker, David WilsonCorrespondence (25 items)1969-1975
Cunha, Antonio B. daCorrespondence (18 items)1962-1975
Darlington, Cyril DeanCorrespondence (6 items)1933-1974
DeGaray, Alfonso LeonCorrespondence (31 items)1970-1975
Demerec, MilislavCorrespondence (7 items)1936-1939
Dobzhansky, Theodosius -- BrazilCorrespondence (2 folders)1973
Dobzhansky, Theodosius -- Mexican tripCorrespondence (16 items)1938, 1974
Dobzhansky, Theodosius -- Research notebooksNotebooks (54 volumes)Circa 1917-1974
Dubinin, Nikolai PetrovichCorrespondence (9 items)1936, 1967-1969
Dunn, Leslie ClarenceCorrespondence (18 items)1936-1974
Ehrman, Lee RothschildCorrespondence (24 items)1971-1976
Epling, CarlCorrespondence (3 items)Circa 1963
Evolutionary BiographyCorrespondence (278 items)1967-1975
Felix Estrada, RodolfoCorrespondence (17 items)1961-1975
Filipchenko, Yurii AleksandrovichCorrespondence (38 items)1927-1930
Gottesman, Irving I.Correspondence (7 items)1970-1971
Green, Melvin MartinCorrespondence (6 items)1970-1975
Greetings (70th birthday)Correspondence (6 folders)1969
Gustafsson, AkeCorrespondence (5 items)1969-1974
Havender, William R.Correspondence (5 items)1963-1975
Hirsch, JerryCorrespondence (4 items)1961
Jensen, Arthur RobertCorrespondence (17 items)1972-1975
Jukes, Thomas H.Correspondence (17 items)1969-1975
Kastritsis, Costas D.Correspondence (17 items)1970-1973
Kerkis, Julius J.Correspondence (82 items)1920-1975
King, Jack LesterCorrespondence (24 items)1970-1976
King, Robert C.Correspondence (10 items)1971-1975
Koref-Santibanez, SusiCorrespondence (14 items)1970-1974
Krimbas, Costas B.Correspondence (14 items)1970-1975
Lerner, Isadore MichaelCorrespondence (59 items)1970-1975
Levine, LouisCorrespondence (12 items)1973-1975
Levit, Mikhail M.Correspondence (4 items)1930-1935
Lewontin, Richard CharlesCorrespondence (46 items)1961-1975
Malogolowkin-Cohen, ChanaCorrespondence (34 items)1970-1975
Mayr, ErnstCorrespondence (79 items)1960-1975
Medvedev, Zhores A.Correspondence (38 items)1969-1972
Moore, John AlexanderCorrespondence (8 items)1970-1975
Muntzing, ArneCorrespondence (5 items)1970-1974
Patterson, John ThomasCorrespondence (7 items)1936-1939
Pavan, C.Correspondence (8 items)1956-1962
Petit, ClaudineCorrespondence (24 items)1970-1975
Powell, Jeffrey R.Correspondence (68 items)1970-1975
Richmond, Rollin C.Correspondence (69 items)1970-1975
Salceda, Victor ManuelCorrespondence (13 items)1973-1975
Scarr-Salapatek, SandraCorrespondence (16 items)1973-1975
Schmalhausen, Ivan IvanovichCorrespondence (1 item)1930
Simpson, George GaylordCorrespondence (35 items)1957-1974
Spiess, Eliot B.Correspondence (20 items)1961-1975
Stebbins, G. LedyardCorrespondence (35 items)1961-1975
Timofeeff-Ressovsky, Nikolai W.Correspondence (2 items)1969-1970
Wallace, BruceCorrespondence (27 items)1971-1975
Weisbrot, DavidCorrespondence (11 items)1971-1975
Wright, SewallCorrespondence (6 items)1973-1975

Indexing Terms

Corporate Name(s)

  • Columbia University.
  • University of California, Davis

Subject(s)

  • Biology, genetics, eugenics
  • Drosophila--Genetics
  • Evolution
  • Genetics
  • Race, race relations, racism
  • Russians--United States
Collection overview
ca.1920-19757.5 linear feet

The bulk of the correspondence in the Dobzhansky collection is comprised of invitations, letters of recommendation, travel arrangements, referee reports, requests for visits, reprints, etc., inquiries concerning fellowships, scholarships, graduate study, and postdoctoral work. His travel itinerary was astounding; his letters abounding with comments on the marvels of jet-age transportation.

Many of the letters between Dobzhansky and his former students date from his years at Davis. In addition to the correspondence with L. Ehrman, R.C. Lewontin, J. Powell, R.C. Richmond, E.B. Spiess, and B. Wallace, correspondence with W.W. Anderson (14 items, 1971-75), D.W. Crumpacker (24 items, 1969-75), and D. Weisbrot (12 items, 1971-75) has survived. Dobzhansky considered his graduate students to be his "intellectual progeny," and he remained actively concerned for their work and careers long after they had received their degrees.

Dobzhansky had strong opinions about current political issues, and especially the effect of politics on the freedom of scientists to pursue their work. His letters to J. Powell and his diaries during the early 1970s contain numerous comments on Richard Nixon and Watergate, moreover, he addressed himself to the situations in Chile (Koref-Santibañez, 1970-74; see also Ehrman), Greece (Kastritsis, 1970), and Israel (Weisbrot).

Between 1969 and 1975, Dobzhansky also dealt with the conditions under which Russian geneticists in general, and Zhores Medvedev in particular, were working (see correspondence with M. M. Green, M. D. Grmek, A. Gustafsson, T. H. Jukes, D. G. Kenefick, I. M. Lerner and Medvedev (many in Russian); Muntzing, and van Gelder). Correspondence between Dobzhansky and his Russian colleagues was severely restricted by Soviet authorities for many years, nevertheless he was able to reestablish contact with several of them in the late 1960s, and approximately 175 letters in Russian are preserved in the collection. All date either from 1927-1935 or from 1968-1975, and among the significant correspondents are Y.A. Filipchenko, N.I. Dubinin, I.I. Schmalhausen, N.W. Timoféeff-Ressovsky, and Dobzhansky's former students, Julius Kerkis and M. Levit. Photocopies of Dobzhansky's letters received by Filpchenko, Vavilov, and Medvedev have been added to the collection courtesy of the State Public Library, Leningrad.

1937-19750.25 linear feet

Revealing correspondence between Dobzhansky and the evolutionary biologist, Ernst Mayr, regarding speciation, evolutionary theory, and genetics.

Permission to quote from Series II must be obtained in advance from Ernst Mayr.

ca.1917-197454 volumes; 1.0 linear feet

The fifty-four notebooks and diaries give a virtually uninterrupted first-hand commentary on Dobzhansky's life and career, save for the period 1936-1941. Although the earliest dates are 1934, the first entries (sketches and data on coccinellid beetles) may have been made as early as 1917. With few exceptions, the entries are all in Russian, although two long stretches written in English occur during the late 1940s and early 1950s (presumably the years during which he felt most alienated from Russia) and from 1971 until his death. In an entry from this period, he commented that he was again writing in English so that his last thoughts would be accessible to friends and relatives unable to read Russian.

Throughout the notebooks, Dobzhansky included extracts or copies of personal letters to or from family members and close friends. These record details of Dobzhansky's day-to-day life often lacking in his professional correspondence, and serve to round out the picture of his personality. These preserved items become increasingly numerous as he became older, particularly after the death of his wife in 1968. Among the manuscripts in the collection are 46 essays Dobzhansky wrote about his travels and sent home to his friends. He was often urged to publish these in collected form, but failed to do so. Excerpts from one appeared in 1970; but they were not published in their entirety until edited by Bentley Glass in 1985.

 0.25 linear feet

Manuscript of Dobzhansky's Human Culture: A Moment in Evolution (N.Y.: Columbia, 1983), with proofreader's notations.

19702 vols., 0.25 linear feet

Two bound volumes of published articles dedicated (and usually inscribed) to Dobzhansky on the occasion of his 70th birthday in 1970, written by colleagues, former students, and friends.

19622 vols., 0.25 linear feet

With the paucity of material from early in Dobzhansky's life, the Reminiscences assume a considerable importance for documenting the early parts of his career and, apart from some materials in Russia, are the only source for his life prior to emigration.

The two volumes of "Reminiscences," transcripts from the Columbia Oral History Project interviews conducted by Barbara Land in 1962, give a remarkably coherent and self-conscious picture of Dobzhansky's life. Encompassing descriptions of his childhood and student years in Russia, candid and anecdotal accounts of the people he had known throughout his career, and the places where he had worked and the experiments he had done, the reminiscences also include thoughts on various historical and political issues. Dobzhansky annotated them between 1962-1975, supplying names and dates as he remembered them, and adding information about his family background. The final notes are dated December 17, 1975, the day of his death.

19260.25 linear feet

Journal, in Russian, kept during the year prior to Dobzhansky's departure from the Soviet Union.

Due to the fragility of the original, photocopy must be used.

1935-19751.0 linear feet

A miscellaneous collection of awards and memorabilia, including major awards such as the Kimber Award in Genetics, the National Medal of Science, and the Daniel Elliot Giraud Medal.

ca.1929-19741.5 linear feet

A mixture of candid photographs of Dobzhansky, his wife Natasha, and their friends, and photographs taken during field excursions and at meetings from throughout his career. Includes some formal portraits of Dobzhansky at various stages of life.



Detailed Inventory
Series I: Correspondence
ca.1920-19757.5 linear feet

The bulk of the correspondence in the Dobzhansky collection is comprised of invitations, letters of recommendation, travel arrangements, referee reports, requests for visits, reprints, etc., inquiries concerning fellowships, scholarships, graduate study, and postdoctoral work. His travel itinerary was astounding; his letters abounding with comments on the marvels of jet-age transportation.

Many of the letters between Dobzhansky and his former students date from his years at Davis. In addition to the correspondence with L. Ehrman, R.C. Lewontin, J. Powell, R.C. Richmond, E.B. Spiess, and B. Wallace, correspondence with W.W. Anderson (14 items, 1971-75), D.W. Crumpacker (24 items, 1969-75), and D. Weisbrot (12 items, 1971-75) has survived. Dobzhansky considered his graduate students to be his "intellectual progeny," and he remained actively concerned for their work and careers long after they had received their degrees.

Dobzhansky had strong opinions about current political issues, and especially the effect of politics on the freedom of scientists to pursue their work. His letters to J. Powell and his diaries during the early 1970s contain numerous comments on Richard Nixon and Watergate, moreover, he addressed himself to the situations in Chile (Koref-Santibañez, 1970-74; see also Ehrman), Greece (Kastritsis, 1970), and Israel (Weisbrot).

Between 1969 and 1975, Dobzhansky also dealt with the conditions under which Russian geneticists in general, and Zhores Medvedev in particular, were working (see correspondence with M. M. Green, M. D. Grmek, A. Gustafsson, T. H. Jukes, D. G. Kenefick, I. M. Lerner and Medvedev (many in Russian); Muntzing, and van Gelder). Correspondence between Dobzhansky and his Russian colleagues was severely restricted by Soviet authorities for many years, nevertheless he was able to reestablish contact with several of them in the late 1960s, and approximately 175 letters in Russian are preserved in the collection. All date either from 1927-1935 or from 1968-1975, and among the significant correspondents are Y.A. Filipchenko, N.I. Dubinin, I.I. Schmalhausen, N.W. Timoféeff-Ressovsky, and Dobzhansky's former students, Julius Kerkis and M. Levit. Photocopies of Dobzhansky's letters received by Filpchenko, Vavilov, and Medvedev have been added to the collection courtesy of the State Public Library, Leningrad.

General physical description: 7.5 linear feet

Abbitt, Raymond
19702 itemsBox 1
Abbou, Richard
19732 itemsBox 1
Abraham, J. C. B,
1970-19724 itemsBox 1
Achievement Rewards for College Scientists
19731 itemBox 1
Adams, Forrest H.
19712 itemsBox 1
Adam, Hans
19702 itemsBox 1
Adams, Mark
1970-19752 foldersBox 1
Folder 1
197510 itemsBox 1
Folder 2
1970-19744 itemsBox 1
Agnew, J. D.
19735 itemsBox 1
Ahrens, A. R.
19331 itemBox 1
Aldine Publishing Company
19742 itemsBox 1
Alexander, Richard D.
19744 foldersBox 1
Folder 1
19743 itemsBox 1
Folder 2
n.d.1 itemBox 1
Folder 3
19741 itemBox 1
Folder 4
19741 itemBox 1
Alfert, Max
19692 itemsBox 1
Alger, Ian E.
19742 itemsBox 1
Allard, Robert Wayne
1971-19722 itemsBox 1
Allen, Garland
19693 itemsBox 1
Almeida Machado, Paulo de
1969-19713 itemsBox 1
Alpatov, V. V. (Vladimir Vladimirovich)
19302 foldersBox 1

General physical description: 2 folders


Subject(s): Russian politics and science

Folder 1
193022 itemsBox 1
Folder 2
19302 itemsBox 1
American Academy of Arts and Sciences
19752 itemsBox 1
American Association for the Advancement of Science
1931-19623 itemsBox 1
American Eugenics Society
19701 itemBox 1
American Historical Review
19732 itemsBox 1
American Institute of Biological Sciences
19735 itemsBox 1
American Museum of Natural History - Distinguished Achievement in Science Award
n.d.1 itemBox 1
American Philosophical Society
1942-197510 itemsBox 1
American Psychologist
19721 itemBox 1
American Scientist
1962-19742 foldersBox 1
Folder 1
1972-19743 itemsBox 1
Folder 2
19621 itemBox 1
American Teilhard de Chardin Association
1970-19742 foldersBox 1
Folder 1
197019 itemsBox 1
Folder 2
1970-197415 itemsBox 1
Anderson, J. P.
19341 itemBox 1
Anderson, Mel
19712 itemsBox 1
Anderson, Wyatt
1971-19752 foldersBox 1

General physical description: 2 folders


Subject(s): Biographical and personal data; Population genetics

Folder 1
1973-197511 itemsBox 1
Folder 2
1971-19744 itemsBox 1
Andros, Edward
19731 itemBox 1
Angelina, Maria
19741 itemBox 1
Anshen, Ruth Nanda
1972-197512 itemsBox 1
Ardrey, Robert
19721 itemBox 1
Arieux, Marianne
19741 itemBox 1
Arizona State University
19692 itemsBox 1
Arnold, Walter
19731 itemBox 1
Ashton, Geoffrey C.
1970-19725 itemsBox 1
Astaurov, B. (Boris L.)
1969-19749 itemsBox 1

General physical description: 9 items


Subject(s): Chetverikov, Sergei S.; Evolution; History of biology, especially genetics; Koltsov, N. K.; Russian politics and science

Ayala, Francisco J.
1970-197513 itemsBox 1

General physical description: 13 items


Subject(s): National Academy of Sciences; Population genetics; Publication

Ayres, Manuel
1969-19704 itemsBox 1
Babcock, E. B.
19341 itemBox 1
Babkov, Vasiili Vailevich
1972-19753 itemsBox 1
Bajema, Carl J.
1971-19734 itemsBox 1
Baker, William K
1961-19725 itemsBox 1
Barker, J. S. F.
1973-19755 itemsBox 1
Band, Henretta T.
1970-19758 itemsBox 1
Bank, Lew
19751 itemBox 1
Banlutal, Corazon O.
19742 itemsBox 1
Bannister, Thomas T.
19722 itemsBox 1
Banque Française du Commerce Exterieur, Paris
19752 itemsBox 1
Barbour, Ian
19741 itemBox 1
Barchas, Jack D.
19723 itemsBox 1
Barigozzi, C.
1972-19746 itemsBox 1
Barnes, Carole Wolff
19711 itemBox 1
Barnes, J. A.
19722 itemsBox 1
Barnett, Thomas
19733 itemsBox 1
Barondess, Jeremiah A.
19732 itemsBox 1
Barr, Thomas C., Jr.
19701 itemBox 1
Barrett, Paul H.
1974-19754 itemsBox 1
Bashor, Philip S.
19712 itemsBox 1
Basic Books
1971-19753 foldersBox 1
Folder 1
1975-197517 itemsBox 1
Folder 2
1972-19736 itemsBox 1
Folder 3
1971-197214 itemsBox 1
Battaglia, Bruno
19702 itemsBox 1
Bauer, Hans
19361 itemBox 1
Beadle, George W.
1961-197211 itemsBox 1
Beardmore, John A.
196217 itemsBox 1
Bearn, Alexander G.
n.d.1 itemBox 1
Begon, Michael
1974-19764 itemsBox 1
Behavior Genetics Association
1972-19735 foldersBox 1
Folder 1
1972-197319 itemsBox 1
Folder 2
1972-19738 itemsBox 1
Folder 3
1972-19739 itemsBox 1
Folder 4
19736 itemsBox 1
Folder 5
19736 itemsBox 1
Belgovsky,
19301 itemBox 1
Beliaev, D. C.
19751 itemBox 1
Bell, Michael A.
1973-197511 itemsBox 1
Beltran, Enrique
19581 itemBox 1
Bennett, Dorothea
1974-19754 itemsBox 1
Bennett, H. Stanley
19611 itemBox 1
Bennett, William E.
19752 itemsBox 1
Benoit, Jaques
19612 itemsBox 1
Benzer, Seymour
19696 itemsBox 1
Berg, L. S.
19351 itemBox 1
Berg, Paul
1969-19702 itemsBox 1
Berg, V.
19691 itemBox 1
Berlin, Sir Isaiah
19706 itemsBox 1
Bibliography
n.d.12 foldersBox 2
Folder 1
n.d.4 itemsBox 2
Folder 2
n.d.2 itemsBox 2
Folder 3
n.d.2 itemsBox 2
Folder 4
n.d.1 itemBox 2
Folder 5
n.d.1 itemBox 2
Folder 6
n.d.7 itemsBox 2
Folder 7
n.d.1 itemBox 2
Folder 8
n.d.4 itemsBox 2
Folder 9
n.d.5 itemsBox 2
Folder 10
n.d.1 itemBox 2
Folder 11
n.d.5 itemsBox 2
Folder 12
n.d.1 itemBox 2
Bijou, Sidney W.
19701 itemBox 2
Bingham, Ronald H.
19721 itemBox 2
Biography
19731 itemBox 2
Birch L. Charles
1961-197537 itemsBox 2

General physical description: 37 items


Subject(s): Ecology; Evolution; Population genetics

Birch, L. C., Review: The Biology of ultimate concern.
n.d.1 itemBox 2
Bird, Christopher
19752 itemsBox 2
Birdsell, Joseph B .
1970-19712 itemsBox 2
Biswas, P. C.
19731 itemBox 2
Blackwell Scientific Publications
19712 itemsBox 2
Blair, W. Frank
19721 itemBox 2
Blitzer, Leon
19732 itemsBox 2
Blyakher, Blacher
19721 itemBox 2
Boardman, Harry
1974-19752 foldersBox 2
Folder 1
19752 itemsBox 2
Folder 2
1974-19751 itemBox 2
Bobbs-Merrill Company, Inc.
19721 itemBox 2
Bock, Carl
19741 itemBox 2
Bock, R. Darrell
19721 itemBox 2
Boerger, Mark
19722 itemsBox 2
Boesiger, Ernest
1973-19754 foldersBox 2

General physical description: 4 folders


Subject(s): Conferences and symposia; Evolution; History of biology, especially genetics; Publication; Travel -- Invitations, arrangements

Folder 1
19736 itemsBox 2
Folder 2
1973-19748 itemsBox 2
Folder 3
197415 itemsBox 2
Folder 4
197521 itemsBox 2
Bogart, James P.
19711 itemBox 2
Bogart Ralph
19731 itemBox 2
Book reviews
1938-19723 foldersBox 2
Folder 1
1971-197224 itemsBox 2
Folder 2
1942-196218 itemsBox 2
Folder 3
1938-197280 itemsBox 2
Bose, Normal Kumar
19621 itemBox 2
Boslooper, Thomas
19751 itemBox 2
Boucot, Arthur J.
19753 itemsBox 2
Boughey, A.
19702 itemsBox 2
Bowman, Barbara H.
19731 itemBox 2
Bowman, Robert I.
1961-19622 itemsBox 2
Boyd, William C.
1970-19733 itemsBox 2
Bradshaw, A. D.
1969-19713 itemsBox 2
Braidwood, Robert J.
19611 itemBox 2
Brauer, Jerald C.
19702 itemsBox 2
Braver, Gerald
19712 itemsBox 2
Brazil
19732 foldersBox 2

General physical description: 2 folders


Subject(s): Political issues; Population genetics; Powell, Jeffrey R.; Teaching; Travel -- Brazil

Folder 1
197322 itemsBox 2
Folder 2
19731 itemBox 2
Braziller, George, Inc.
19746 itemsBox 2
Breitenbach, Robert P.
19731 itemBox 2
Breitenbuch, Bernd von, Jr.
19722 itemsBox 2
Bridges, Calvin B.
19312 itemsBox 2
Brieger, F. G.
19701 itemBox 2
Briggs, Robert W.
19702 itemsBox 2
British Broadcasting Company
1972-197512 itemsBox 2
Broadhurst, Peter L.
19721 itemBox 2
Bronk, Detlev W.
1960-19707 itemsBox 2
Brown, Sanborn C.
19747 itemsBox 2
Bronowski, Jacob
19702 itemsBox 2
Brncic, Danko
1962-197513 itemsBox 2
Brumbach, Roger A.
19752 itemsBox 2
Brune, Arno
19741 itemBox 2
Bryson Vernon
19621 itemBox 2
Burg Wartenstein Conference
ca. 19721 itemBox 3
Burgers, J. M.
19611 itemBox 3
Burgers, Mrs. L.
19742 itemsBox 3
Burhoe, Ralph W.
1970-19742 foldersBox 3

General physical description: 2 folders


Subject(s): Conferences and symposia; Publication

Folder 1
197015 itemsBox 3
Folder 2
1972-197414 itemsBox 3
Burla, U.
19621 itemBox 3
Bush Donald F.
19721 itemBox 3
Bush, Vannevar
1939-19402 itemsBox 3
Butler, K. S.
19712 itemsBox 3
Butler, Nicholas Murray
19442 itemsBox 3
Buzzati-Traverso, Adriano A.
1935-19622 itemsBox 3
Callahan, Daniel
1973-19752 itemsBox 3
Camargo, Felisberto C.
19361 itemBox 3
Campbell, Bernard
1968-19759 itemsBox 3
Campbell, Donald T.
1972-19752 foldersBox 3
Folder 1
1972-19753 itemsBox 3
Folder 2
19753 itemsBox 3
Camper, N. Dwight
19691 itemBox 3
Canadian Journal of Zoology
19752 itemsBox 3
Canfield, Cass, Jr.
19611 itemBox 3
Cappelletti, Vincenzo
19754 itemsBox 3
Carducci-Artenisio, Reine
19701 itemBox 3
Carey, Jack C.
19732 itemsBox 3
Carlson, Albert D.
1970-19711 itemBox 3
Carlson, Elof Axel
19731 itemBox 3
Carlson, William D.
19711 itemBox 3
Carothers, J. Edward
1971-19745 itemsBox 3
Carron, Malcolm
19743 itemsBox 3
Carson, Hampton L.
1970-19755 foldersBox 3

General physical description: 5 folders


Subject(s): Biographical and personal data; Conferences and symposia; Ethical issues; National Academy of Sciences; Population genetics

Folder 1
1970-197217 itemsBox 3
Folder 2
19739 itemsBox 3
Folder 3
19735 itemsBox 3
Folder 4
19744 itemsBox 3
Folder 5
19759 itemsBox 3
Carter, Jack L.
19722 itemsBox 3
Caspari, Ernst W.
1970-19753 itemsBox 3
Castle, William E.
19331 itemBox 3
Castri, Francesco di
1970-19712 itemsBox 3
Catchside, D. G.
19715 itemsBox 3
Cavalli-Sforza, L. L.
1970-19725 itemsBox 3
Chase, Herman B.
1970-19712 itemsBox 3
Chaudhuri, R.
19731 itemBox 3
Cheney, Brainerd
19711 itemBox 3
Chipman, Robert K.
19722 itemsBox 3
"Chromosomal"
19732 itemsBox 3
Clarendon Press
1971-19747 itemsBox 3
Clarke, A. S.
19741 itemBox 3
Clarke, Bryan
19701 itemBox 3
Clarkson College of Technology
19651 itemBox 3
Clausen, Jens
19691 itemBox 3
Cleffmann, G.
19751 itemBox 3
Cobb, John B . Jr.
1972-19749 itemsBox 3
Cock, Alan G.
19754 itemsBox 3
Cockerell, Theo D. A.
1932-19374 itemsBox 3
Coe, Mrs. Michael D.
1959-19628 itemsBox 3
Cohen, Barry Mendel
19751 itemBox 3
Cohen, Bernice H.
19701 itemBox 3
Cohen, Chana Malogolowkov
19702 itemsBox 3
Cohen, Mortimer Theodore
19711 itemBox 3
Cohn, Bradford
19731 itemBox 3
Coleman, John R.
19733 itemsBox 3
College of Wooster
19452 itemsBox 3
Collias, Nicholas E.
19732 itemsBox 3
Colloque Mondial Biologie et Devenir de l'Homme
1973-197410 itemsBox 3
Colombera, Dario
19731 itemBox 3
Colorado State University
19731 itemBox 3
Columbia Today
19751 itemBox 3
Columbia University
1949-19623 itemsBox 3
Columbia University. Dept. of Zoology
19621 itemBox 3
Columbia University Press
1961-197519 itemsBox 3
Coluzzi, Mario
19725 itemsBox 3
Comas, Juan
19711 itemBox 3
Commentary
19744 itemsBox 3
Commoner, Barry
19702 itemsBox 3
Coon Carleton S.
1962-19752 itemsBox 3
Cooper. Christopher J.
19721 itemBox 3
Corbiere, H.
19691 itemBox 3
Cordeiro, Antonio R.
1967-19737 itemsBox 3

General physical description: 7 items


Subject(s): Population genetics

Cordón, F.
19621 itemBox 3
Corfman, Philip A.
19734 itemsBox 3
Cornell University Press
19741 itemBox 3
Corning, Peter A.
1973-19744 itemsBox 3
Corson, David W.
1974-19753 itemsBox 3
Cory, Lawrence
1969-197113 itemsBox 3
Coward-McCann, Inc, Publishers
19701 itemBox 3
Crackpot letters
1970-19743 foldersBox 3
Folder 1
1973-19758 itemsBox 3
Folder 2
1971-19726 itemsBox 3
Folder 3
1970-197515 itemsBox 3
Crandell, Merrell E.
19712 itemsBox 3
Cravdns, Hamilton
19723 itemsBox 3
Crawford, M. H.
19702 itemsBox 3
Creed, E. Robert
1970-19748 itemsBox 3
CRM Books
19741 itemBox 3
Crow, James F.
1961-19722 foldersBox 3

General physical description: 2 folders


Subject(s): Behavioral genetics, IQ; Evolution; Muller, Hermann Joseph; National Academy of Sciences; Shockley, William; Wallace, Bruce; Wright, Sewall

Folder 1
1970-19728 itemsBox 3
Folder 2
1961-19627 itemsBox 3
Crowell, Thomas Y., Company
19741 itemBox 3
Cruise, John
19701 itemBox 3
Crumpacker, David Wilson
1969-19752 foldersBox 3

General physical description: 2 folders


Subject(s): Population genetics; Recommendations -- Richmond, Rollin C.; Research support; Travel -- Invitations, arrangements

Folder 1
197513 itemsBox 3
Folder 2
1968-197012 itemsBox 3
Crutchfield, Richard S.
19711 itemBox 3
Cuenca, Carlos Luis de
19753 itemsBox 3
Cullen, Joseph W.
19713 itemsBox 3
Cunha, Antonio B. da
1962-197518 itemsBox 3

General physical description: 18 items


Subject(s): Biographical and personal data; Population genetics; Publication; Travel -- Brazil

Current Anthropology Journal
19732 itemsBox 3
Daeley, John
19702 itemsBox 4
Dane, Albert E.
19741 itemBox 4
Dansereau, Pierre
19682 itemsBox 4
Darlington, Cyril Dean
1933-19746 itemsBox 4

General physical description: 6 items


Subject(s): Cytogenetics; Political issues; Reviews; Travel -- India; Travel -- Japan; World War II -- Impact on science

Darwin, Charles Robert
1958-19592 itemsBox 4
Dausset, Jean
19711 itemBox 4
Davenport, Demorest
1970-19755 itemsBox 4
Davenport, John W.
19704 itemsBox 4
David, Edward E., Jr
19722 itemsBox 4
David, Jean
1974-19752 itemsBox 4
Davidheiser, Bolton
197512 itemsBox 4
Davis, Bernard D.
1970-19741 itemBox 4
Davis, Fred
19738 itemsBox 4
Davis, Kingsley
19701 itemBox 4
Davitashvili,
1966-19696 itemsBox 4
Dawood, Mahoud
19713 itemsBox 4
Dawson, Peter S.
1970-19732 itemsBox 4
DeFries, John C.
1970-19723 itemsBox 4
DeGaray, Alfonso Leon
1970-19754 foldersBox 4

General physical description: 4 folders


Subject(s): Evolution; Invitations; Population genetics

Folder 1
1970-19712 itemsBox 4
Folder 2
1971-19748 itemsBox 4
Folder 3
197516 itemsBox 4
Folder 4
19755 itemsBox 4
Delden, W. V.
19702 itemsBox 4
Delsol, Michel
19741 itemBox 4
Demerec, Milislav
1936-19397 itemsBox 4

General physical description: 7 items


Subject(s): Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory; Columbia University; Drosophila genetics; Research support

Dempster, Everett
19703 itemsBox 4
DaMurtas, A.
19723 itemsBox 4
Dessauer, Herbert
1974-19752 itemsBox 4
Dethier, Vincent G
19702 itemsBox 4
Deutsche Akademie der Naturforscher Leopoldina
19702 itemsBox 4
DeVore, Irven
1970-19718 itemsBox 4
Dewey, Maynard M.
1970-19732 itemsBox 4
DeWit, J. J. Duyvené
19641 itemBox 4
Deinstman, Steven R
19702 itemsBox 4
Dillé, John E.
19732 itemsBox 4
Dimond, Stuart J.
ca.19761 itemBox 4
Dingle, Hugh
19713 itemsBox 4
Diplomas
1945-19688 itemsBox 4
Dische, Zacharias
19731 itemBox 4
Ditfurth, Hoimar von
19732 itemsBox 4
Dobzhansky, T., Are Men Born Unequal After All?
19701 itemBox 4
Dobzhansky, T., Autogiographical Note
n.d.1 itemBox 4
Dobzhansky, T., Belem do Para
19523 itemsBox 4
Dobzhansky, T., Catholicity and Mission to the World
n.d.2 itemsBox 4
Dobzhansky, T., Cedrus Libani
19563 itemsBox 4
Dobzhansky, T., Columbia's Pacific Outlet
19585 itemsBox 4
Dobzhansky, T., Concerning holes in academic gowns
19533 itemsBox 4
Dobzhansky, T., Condor's feathers
19562 itemsBox 4
Dobzhansky, T., Crisis of Soviet Biology
19542 itemsBox 4
Dobzhansky, T., Crumbs from the table of Mr. Ford
19521 itemBox 4
Dobzhansky, T., Darkness in the Forest
19583 itemsBox 4
Dobzhansky, T., Equator in the back yard
1952(?)4 itemsBox 4
Dobzhansky, T., Faces of Shiva
19602 itemsBox 4
Dobzhansky, T., Finis Terrae
19562 itemsBox 4
Dobzhansky, T., Guests Behaving Inconveniently Shall Be Asked to Leave the Hotel Immediately
19551 itemBox 4
Dobzhansky, T., In the Bulge
19551 itemBox 4
Dobzhansky, T., Indonesia
19601 itemBox 4
Dobzhansky, T., Land of the Flatheads
19562 itemsBox 4
Dobzhansky, T., Land of Friendly Cannibals
19601 itemBox 4
Dobzhansky, T., Mendelismus, Darwinismus und Evolutionismus
19671 itemBox 4
Dobzhansky, T., Personal
1973-19743 foldersBox 4
Folder 1
1973-197418 itemsBox 4
Folder 2
197411 itemsBox 4
Folder 3
19743 itemsBox 4
Dobzhansky, T., Peru and the Andes
19551 itemBox 4
Dobzhansky, T., Photographs, etc.
197518 itemsBox 4
Dobzhansky, T., Population Genetics of Mexican Drosophila
19751 itemBox 4
Dobzhansky, T., Revolution Brazilian style
19553 itemsBox 4
Dobzhansky, T., Strangling Fig Trees
 2 itemsBox 4
Dobzhansky, T., The Sweet River
19521 itemBox 4
Dobzhansky, T., Three Crowded Days in the Holy Land
19561 itemBox 4
Dobzhansky, T., Validity of the Gene Theory
n.d.1 itemBox 4
Dobzhansky, T., Venture that nearly failed
19521 itemBox 4
Dobzhansky, T., Where tourists never come,
19526 itemsBox 4
Dodson, Edward O.
1971-19735 itemsBox 4
Dolhinow, Phyllis
19712 itemsBox 4
Dornfeld, Ernest
19702 itemsBox 4
Dowden, Hutchinson and Ross, Inc.
19736 itemsBox 4
Doxiadis
19712 itemsBox 4
Doyden, John P
19751 itemBox 4
Dragan, M.
19742 itemsBox 4
Dronamraju, K R.
1970-19712 itemsBox 4
Druger, Marvin
1970-197310 itemsBox 4
Dubinin, Nikolai Petrovich
1936, 1967-19693 foldersBox 4

General physical description: 3 folders


Subject(s): Biographical and personal data; Genetics

Folder 1
1967-19697 itemsBox 4
Folder 2
19361 itemBox 4
Folder 3
19361 itemBox 4
Duchrow, Ulrich
19701 itemBox 4
Duckett, Jeanie
19721 itemBox 4
Dunn, G. M.
19742 itemsBox 4
Dunn, Leslie Clarence
1936-19743 foldersBox 4

General physical description: 3 folders


Subject(s): Biographical and personal data; Columbia University; Drosophila genetics

Folder 1
19741 itemBox 
Folder 2
19616 itemsBox 
Folder 3
1936-194011 itemsBox 
Dunn, Louise
1974-197511 itemsBox 4
Dutton, E. P., and Company, Inc.
1970-19727 itemsBox 4
Dyson Hudson, Rada
1970-19747 itemsBox 4
Easton, Michael
19732 itemsBox 5
Ebling, F. J.
19743 itemsBox 5
Eccles, John C.
1970-19736 itemsBox 5
Eckhardt, Robert B
19721 itemBox 5
Eckland, Bruce K.
1970-197412 itemsBox 5
Eckstrand, Irene Anne
1974-19752 itemsBox 5
Ecology Center Communications Council
19712 itemsBox 5
Editora Pedagóga e Universitária Ltda
19751 itemBox 5
Edizioni Scientifiche e Tecniche, Mondadori
1970-19726 itemsBox 5
Edlin, Gordon
n.d.1 itemBox 5
Edwards, A. W. F.
19722 itemsBox 5
Edwards, Marvin L
19702 itemsBox 5
Egyptian Journal of Genetics and Cytology
19711 itemBox 5
Ehrlich, Paul R.
1970-19712 itemsBox 5
Ehrman, Lee Rothschild
1971-19763 foldersBox 5

General physical description: 3 folders


Subject(s): Ayala, Francisco J.; Biographical and personal data; Laboratory techniques, equipment; Political issues -- Chile; Population genetics; Publication

Folder 1
1971-19727 itemsBox 5
Folder 2
1972-197311 itemsBox 5
Folder 3
1974-19766 itemsBox 5
Eibl-Eibesfeldt, I.
19742 itemsBox 5
Eiseley, Loren
1972-19733 itemsBox 5
Eisner, Thomas
19722 itemsBox 5
Elens, A. I.
19701 itemBox 5
Elliot, Pamela
19711 itemBox 5
Elovson, Jo
19712 itemsBox 5
Elston, Robert C
19721 itemBox 5
EMBO Workshop on Molecular Evolution
197412 itemsBox 5
Emboden, William A.
19752 itemsBox 5
Emerson, Alfred E.
1961-19622 itemsBox 5
Encyclopedia Americana
1970-19712 itemsBox 5
Encyclopaedia Britannica
1971-19747 itemsBox 5
Encyclopaedia of the Future
19732 itemsBox 5
Encyclopedia Universalis
19721 itemBox 5
Endler John A.
19731 itemBox 5
Epling, Carl
ca. 19633 itemsBox 5

General physical description: 3 items


Subject(s): Biographical and personal data; Ethical issues; Travel -- Ecuador

Erasmus, Charles J.
19741 itemBox 5
Erlenmeyer-Kimling, L.
1972-19753 itemsBox 5
Estrada, Rodolfo Felix
  

See Félix Estrada, Rodolfo

Evans, E. Burke
19724 itemsBox 5
Evolution (periodical)
1970-197512 itemsBox 5
Evolution (book)
1973-19752 itemsBox 5
Evolution Protest Movement
19611 itemBox 5
Evolutionary Biology
1967-197519 foldersBox 5

General physical description: 19 folders


Subject(s): Editorial matters; Evolution; Publication -- Evolutionary Biology

Folder 1
1967-197013 itemsBox 5
Folder 2
197015 itemsBox 5
Folder 3
1971 - 197219 itemsBox 5
Folder 4
197213 itemsBox 5
Folder 5
197217 itemsBox 5
Folder 6
19722 itemsBox 5
Folder 7
19721 itemBox 5
Folder 8
19721 itemBox 5
Folder 9
197214 itemsBox 5
Folder 10
197314 itemsBox 5
Folder 11
197320 itemsBox 5
Folder 12
197314 itemsBox 5
Folder 13
197314 itemsBox 5
Folder 14
197414 itemsBox 5
Folder 15
197417 itemsBox 5
Folder 16
197427 itemsBox 5
Folder 17
1974-197518 itemsBox 5
Folder 18
197519 itemsBox 5
Folder 19
197526 itemsBox 5
Ewan, Joseph
19722 itemsBox 5
Ewing, Arthur W.
19702 itemsBox 5
Falek, Arthur
19711 itemBox 5
Falk, Raphael
19722 itemsBox 5
Farber, Geraldine
1971-19732 itemsBox 5
Farber, Seymour M
1971-19724 itemsBox 5
Farmer, W. W.
19621 itemBox 5
Feldman, Jerry
19712 itemsBox 5
Félix Estrada, Rodolfo
1961-19752 foldersBox 5

General physical description: 2 folders


Subject(s): Drosophila genetics; Population genetics; Publication; Travel -- Mexico

Folder 1
1973, 19759 itemsBox 5
Folder 2
19758 itemsBox 5
Fennell, Daniel J.
1970-19714 itemsBox 5
Ferguson, Anthony
19742 itemsBox 5
Field, Andrew
1970-19712 itemsBox 5
Filipchenko, Yurii Aleksandrovich
1927-19304 foldersBox 5

General physical description: 4 folders


Subject(s): Biographical and personal data; California Institute of Technology; Columbia University

Folder 1
192911 itemsBox 5
Folder 2
192813 itemsBox 5
Folder 3
19285 itemsBox 5
Folder 4
19289 itemsBox 5
Fisher, A. M., Jr.
19705 itemsBox 6
Fisher, F. J. F.
19714 itemsBox 6
Fisher, P. J.
19702 itemsBox 6
Fisher, R. B., Jr.
19733 itemsBox 6
Fitch, Walter M.
19701 itemBox 6
Fleming, Joyce Dudley
19732 itemsBox 6
Fontdenla, Antonio
19741 itemBox 6
Forcey, Robert M.
19691 itemBox 6
Ford, C. E.
19712 itemsBox 6
Ford, Donald C.
19721 itemBox 6
Ford, E. B.
1961-19754 foldersBox 6
Folder 1
1961-196210 itemsBox 6
Folder 2
1970-197328 itemsBox 6
Folder 3
19747 itemsBox 6
Folder 4
197511 itemsBox 6
FORGE (Fund of Overseas Research Grants and Education)
19702 itemsBox 6
Fosberg, F. R.
19621 itemBox 6
Francoeur, Robert
19703 itemsBox 6
Frankel, Otto H.
1961-19623 itemsBox 6
Franklin, Esther
19742 itemsBox 6
Franklin Institute
1973-19742 foldersBox 6
Folder 1
1973-19744 itemsBox 6
Folder 2
19732 itemsBox 6
Fraser, Alexander S.
1962-19705 itemsBox 6
Fraser, G. R.
19752 itemsBox 6
Freeman, Derek
1970-19726 itemsBox 6
Freeman, W. H. and Company
19756 itemsBox 6
Freeman, Walter J.
19712 itemsBox 6
French C. Stacy
1971-19734 itemsBox 6
Friedmann, Theodore
19742 itemsBox 6
Fromn, Robert
19712 itemsBox 6
Frota-Pessoa
19611 itemBox 6
Fu, Jack
19712 itemsBox 6
Fugazy Travel Bureau, Inc.
19621 itemBox 6